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Maximum Security Prison, Yenagoa

By Idam, Ugo

Several years age, the author had a childish fascination with prisons - the
place where one is deprived of everything pleasurable, including 'tee vee'; and one had to live on stale bread and water. Tales out of prison recounted by celebrity inmates such as the late Fela Anikulapo-Kuti intensified my mixed feelings of wonder and horror. Later as a student of architecture. I began to wonder what it would be like to design 'cages' for human beings.
The media is rife with reports about the inhuman conditions of our prisons.
Former human rights organisations condemn the dehumanising state of our
prisons. The cells are not only poorly lit and ventilated, they are also overcrowded; sanitary facilities are virtually unheard of; the workshops are under funded as well as under-utilised; and generally death is almost to be preferred to the prospect of incarceration in our prisons.

Published: 16/11/1999

Tags: maximum security prison, Yenagoa, planning, environment, conviction, seurity, site, location

Size: 21.66MB

Capital Hotel Awka M.Sc. (Arch) Thesis Report

By Ezeani, Charles O.

The hotel industry is such that when prudently designed and efficiently managed brings satisfaction and wealth to the operator.
A hotel is therefore a place meant for good travellers who, ordinarily, would not have a home in the place of their destination. They are therefore sheltered and fed in any hotel of their choice while doing their honest business.

Published: 26/07/1994

Tags: thesis, Capital Hotel, report,

Size: 29.31MB

Resort Hotel, Asaba

By Ameh, Joseph Eche

Since Asaba became the newly created capital of Delta State, the city has experienced large d u x of people, coupled with the natural fast growing nature of the town. Asaba, also house over 30% of the businessmen of Onitsha on
temporary permanent visit or stay. The town also, has branches of all the major bank in Nigeria, and numerous private ventures. It therefore, becomes ironical that it has no standard luxurious lodging facility. Moreso, with it's position in relation to the River Niger, it stands a great chance of establishing a Resort-Hotel type. This hotel will combine the best recreational facilities possible for a hotel, business facilities. accommodation, convention facilities, etc in a single complex.
This thesis work is in seven chapters. Chapters 1 - 3 deals with the
introduction, historical background, and case studies respectively. Chapters 4 - 6
examines the site studies, facilities prograrnming, and environmental services
respectively . While the concluding chapter, chapter seven, treats the facilities
programming and the design solution. This thesis gives an insight into Resort-Hotel design, the do's and don't, the limitations, the organization, and the solutions.

Published: 11/10/1998

Tags: hotel, resort, 1998, lodge, facilities. Ameh Joseph

Size: 9.59MB

Beauty and Fitness Centre Abuja (An M.Sc. (Arch) Thesis Report)

By Amorha, Chinwe Nnenna

About six months ago, it forcefully struck me
that too many Nigerians led very sedentary lives
(possibly because of the kind of jobs they have)
and like a vicious cycle, inactivity bred laziness
and laziness in turn bred inactivity. The country's
administrators in the past three to four years must
have seen this as well because there were national
programmes organised so that everybody could got
into the "keep-fitt' regime. How far this has gone
in helping the situation is another matter entirely,
but that the awareness has been created is the
imphrtant thing. I found then that it' would not be
difficult for the average Nigerian to get into the
Beauty treatment and keep-fit habit if facilities
were provided for such purpose.

Published: 14/07/1994

Size: 19.39MB

Water Transport Terminal Oron Akwa Ibom State

By Affia, Okon Isaac

Transportation development reflects the state of advancement of a nation.
Thus, for a sound communication network, organized commercial transaction,
and general development of a community, an efficient transportation system is
of utmost necessity. The Nigerian situation cannot however be said to be
fully in consonance with accepted standards laid out for such a system.
The Nigerian Government has been much inclined to the development of
road and air transportation without adequate socio-economic appraisals. This
however has led to an inefficient transportation system in our coastal areas
which have been quite supportive to the growth of our national economy, in
terms of their agricultural products, oil and mineral deposits.
The Study of this thesis report on the proposed water transport terminal for
Oron is done with a view to achieving an effective transportation system
that will satisfy the yearnings of our river-side communities.
This thesis report is divided into eight chapters. The first chapter dwells on
the introductory part of the thesis, its motivation, aims and objectives,
research methodology and problems encountered during the research work,
etc.
Chapter two deals with the history of water transportation in Nigeria:
befbre, during and after the colonial rule, as well as parameters that
influence safe navigation, the inland waterways network and problem
identification. The chapter that follows analysis details of local
transportation system in Akwa Ibom State with particular reference to Oron.
Chapter four appraises the local and foreign case studies of water terminal,
while chapter six deals with proposed site for the project with its climatic
.data and consideration respectively.
Chapter six and seven dwells on the design criteria and special design
considerations while the last chapter highlights the design concept, space
requirements and programme.
I am optimistic that those concerned with the planning and development of
water transport terminals in the country with find this thesis research work
very relevant during their course of duty.

Published: 10/10/1997

Size: 4.94MB

Anaedo Unity Square (Community Centre) Nnewi

By Agbasi, Emeka Kenneth

Historically, a community's sense of identity has always been traced to the
spirit of communal interaction of one form or the other among people. This fact in
recent times is further demonstrated in elaborate festivals, numerous lectures,
seminars, symposia, workshops organized by government and non-governmental
organization as well as private individuals to support community centre development.
Community centres provides a healthy and attractive atmosphere in which all its
inhabitant have equal opportunity to participate in programmes despite their fast
expanding economic and socia1 life style as against the allien system which
encourages individualization in activity and life style.
A community Centre is therefore the proper venue for such emphasised
communal lifestyle and activity focus point. Such a centre plays effectively the
historic role of stimulating and deepening the sense of identity and spirit of self-help
to tackle community problems based on local needs and interest. Our communities
are growing very fast and our youths are imbibing this Western Culture and way of
life rather too fast to the detriment of our own cuIture and social value, which if left
unchecked will leave us as a people without history and way of life not only for our
own immediate generations but also generations to come.
Based on these reasons and many others, the need for a community centre for
a fast gowing town like Nnewi is not only timely but long awaited. For purpose of
literature this project is divided into section called chapters.
Chapter one deals with the proposal which highlight the introduction of the
subject matter, stating the aims, objectives, motivations and also highlighting some
architectural problems, scope and limitation of study. It also states research
methodology and limitation, importance of study, sources of hnds and management.
The second chapter talks more on definition of conceptual issues in
Community Centres tracing the origin of Community Centres in Greece, Rome,
United Kingdom, United States of America and the Traditional Nigerian Community.
Recent trends in Community Centres is also discussed.
Chapter three deals proper with historical development of Nnewi Town where
the Community Centre is to be provided. Brief history of Nnewi Town is discussed

Published: 14/10/1998

Size: 32.57MB

MOTHER AND CHILD HEALTH CARE CENTRE IDAH, KOGI STATE. (A study on Circulation in Hospital Spaces)

By Idoko A.

Circulation in hospitals is synonymous to the nerves and arteries of a human heart.
Life is in the blood, yet without the nerves and the arteries blood cannot be distributed to every part of the body. If there is a cut or damage to a nerve or an artery the flow of blood would be distorted and in most cases leads to other illnesses .Good circulation therefore is a very important consideration in a hospital design. Spaces should be safe, convenient, and interesting.
Effective circulation is essential for all buildings for both normal and emergency conditions. Circulation in hospitals has to do with functionality of spaces, inter-relationship between spaces and nearness between activity flows.
This research seeks to carry out an in-depth study of hospital circulation in other to identify and promote the existing circulation patterns, review similar research works and obtain data, and information relevant to the area of study. This way, it would be an invaluable compendium of data to researcher in this field of study.

Published: 16/10/2014

Size: 11.98MB

EVALUATION OF DESIGN ADEQUACY OF RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN PUBLIC SECTOR HOUSING IN ENUGU, NIGERIA (1999-2013)

By Odum, Chinwuba Onyechi

This study assessed the design adequacy of public sector housing estates developed in Enugu urban between 1999 and 2013. The specific goal was to evaluate the design adequacy of residential buildings in the estates, with the intent of examining the adequacy of housing types with regard to design and environmental attributes; determining the adequacy of functional usable spaces in the buildings against the approved standards, and determining the differences in residents satisfaction levels with regard to their housing types and functional needs. The study adopted the survey design. Consequently, three major instruments, personal observations, questionnaire and semi-structured interview (SSI) were used to generate the required data. The questionnaire was face-validated by three experts: two are lecturers from Department of Architecture of this University and one is an independent statistician. The population of the study consisted of 879 housing units, out of which 648 units (73.72%) were occupied, in the nine housing estates in Enugu. Purposive screening was employed to exclude both the not-purely residential estates and the non-prototype houses built by individuals. In the end, we obtained five purely residential estates and 659 prototype housing units, out of which 478 occupied units (72.53%) were surveyed. Data analysis was done with the aid of Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS), and descriptive statistics such as frequency, percentages, means and standard deviations were used to summarize the data, and answer the research questions. Principal Component Analysis and One-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) were used to test the hypotheses. The result of the study indicated that the majority (65.8%) of the housing residents belonged to upper middle and higher income classes. The greater majority (80.1%) of the housing types developed within the study period were mainly 4, 5 and 6-bedrooms single family detached duplexes. The analysis for the identifiable pattern in housing types and design as well as environmental attributes in the housing estates was found to be significant. This means that the housing types in the estates actually varied. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique used yielded seven components, and accounted for 91.5% of the variance in the variables. The analysis for the difference between the measured usable designed spaces and the approved standards was also found from the analysis of variance carried out to be significant at 0.036% (less than 0.05). This signifies that the measured spaces were significantly different from the approved standards. This supports result from the study which indicated that the means of the designed functional spaces in the different building types are higher than those of the approved standards. The analysis of variance between housing residents’ satisfaction in terms of their housing types and functional needs was found to be significant at less than 0.01. Therefore, there are identifiable significant differences in residents’ housing satisfaction levels in terms of their housing types and functional needs. Result of the study points up to adequacy of design of the residential buildings in public sector housing estates in Enugu in the study period; but it also suggests that in addition to building designs, considerations for efficient housing development also need to be anchored on required housing types, residents’ needs, as well as overall design and environmental adequacies.

Published: 15/11/2015

Size: 10.17MB

MUSEUM OF CULTURAL HISTORY PORTHARCORT: EFFECTIVE USE OF NATURAL LIGHTING IN MUSEUM INTERIOR SPACES

By Ndiomu Oyinkuro

The building which houses objects of historic and cultural interest of a people is a tool to educate and enlighten the younger generation about the life and activities of their forefathers. Most of these objects found in the museums (which were used by our forefathers) are old, fragile and delicate.How they are being protectedagainst climatic factors such as rain sun and wind are of great importance.
A museum preserves and exhibits artefacts, whereas the interpretive plan for an exhibit, determining the most effective methods of communicating a message or telling a story to an observer. One of the major considerations in a museum as regards achieving the said measures in exhibition space is ‘effective lighting’.Sun light being one of the major sources of energy and light during the day is the clearest form of light since it contains all the spectral colours.
This thesis right up is exploring the various methods of introducing natural lighting into the interior spaces without causing unnecessary glare and also protecting exhibits from direct sunlight which contains Ultra-violent rays which is highly detrimental to artifacts.

Published: 10/07/2018

Size: 19.29MB

MOTHER AND CHILD HEALTH CARE CENTRE IDAH, KOGI STATE.

By Idoko A.

Circulation in hospitals is synonymous to the nerves and arteries of a human heart.
Life is in the blood, yet without the nerves and the arteries blood cannot be distributed to every part of the body. If there is a cut or damage to a nerve or an artery the flow of blood would be distorted and in most cases leads to other illnesses .Good circulation therefore is a very important consideration in a hospital design. Spaces should be safe, convenient, and interesting.
Effective circulation is essential for all buildings for both normal and emergency conditions. Circulation in hospitals has to do with functionality of spaces, inter-relationship between spaces and nearness between activity flows.
This research seeks to carry out an in-depth study of hospital circulation in other to identify and promote the existing circulation patterns, review similar research works and obtain data, and information relevant to the area of study. This way, it would be an invaluable compendium of data to researcher in this field of study.

Published: 07/07/2018

Size: 11.98MB

EVALUATION OF DESIGN ADEQUACY OF RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN PUBLIC SECTOR HOUSING IN ENUGU, NIGERIA (1999-2013)

By Odum, Chinwuba Onyechi

This study assessed the design adequacy of public sector housing estates developed in Enugu urban between 1999 and 2013. The specific goal was to evaluate the design adequacy of residential buildings in the estates, with the intent of examining the adequacy of housing types with regard to design and environmental attributes; determining the adequacy of functional usable spaces in the buildings against the approved standards, and determining the differences in residents satisfaction levels with regard to their housing types and functional needs. The study adopted the survey design. Consequently, three major instruments, personal observations, questionnaire and semi-structured interview (SSI) were used to generate the required data. The questionnaire was face-validated by three experts: two are lecturers from Department of Architecture of this University and one is an independent statistician. The population of the study consisted of 879 housing units, out of which 648 units (73.72%) were occupied, in the nine housing estates in Enugu. Purposive screening was employed to exclude both the not-purely residential estates and the non-prototype houses built by individuals. In the end, we obtained five purely residential estates and 659 prototype housing units, out of which 478 occupied units (72.53%) were surveyed. Data analysis was done with the aid of Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS), and descriptive statistics such as frequency, percentages, means and standard deviations were used to summarize the data, and answer the research questions. Principal Component Analysis and One-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) were used to test the hypotheses. The result of the study indicated that the majority (65.8%) of the housing residents belonged to upper middle and higher income classes. The greater majority (80.1%) of the housing types developed within the study period were mainly 4, 5 and 6-bedrooms single family detached duplexes. The analysis for the identifiable pattern in housing types and design as well as environmental attributes in the housing estates was found to be significant. This means that the housing types in the estates actually varied. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique used yielded seven components, and accounted for 91.5% of the variance in the variables. The analysis for the difference between the measured usable designed spaces and the approved standards was also found from the analysis of variance carried out to be significant at 0.036% (less than 0.05). This signifies that the measured spaces were significantly different from the approved standards. This supports result from the study which indicated that the means of the designed functional spaces in the different building types are higher than those of the approved standards. The analysis of variance between housing residents’ satisfaction in terms of their housing types and functional needs was found to be significant at less than 0.01. Therefore, there are identifiable significant differences in residents’ housing satisfaction levels in terms of their housing types and functional needs. Result of the study points up to adequacy of design of the residential buildings in public sector housing estates in Enugu in the study period; but it also suggests that in addition to building designs, considerations for efficient housing development also need to be anchored on required housing types, residents’ needs, as well as overall design and environmental adequacies.

Published: 07/07/2018

Size: 10.17MB

AUTOMOBILE DEALERSHIP CENTRE (A STUDY ON FIRE SAFETY AND PRECAUTIONARY MEASURES)

By Anih, Ejike Kingsley

ABSTRACT
The growing awareness of the importance of fire safety consideration in building has led to the emergence and recognition of different fire safety measures in the design and construction of buildings. This independent research project is therefore aimed at identifying the nature, causes and effects of fire in buildings with particular reference to Automobile/Auto mall canter and to suggest appropriate measures that can be applied to avert or reduce the fire outbreak in such facilities.
Fire can occur either by electrical malfunctioning, arson, carelessness and natural occurrence. Fire safety measures include those that are planned during the design of a building or implemented in structures that are already standing, and those that are taught to occupants of the building.
This research will address the issue of fire in general and fire safety in automobile/auto mall. It will research on design characteristics of buildings, safety awareness in design and building practices. The study will identify various causes of fire in buildings and other related facilities or structures, how they can be prevented and ways by which architects and designers through planning from concept stage can use elements of circulation such as elevators, escalators, stairs, hall ways, courtyard to mention a few and other fire safety precaution in the prevention of fire, and as a means for providing escape (for persons and goods) during fire outbreak.

Published: 11/03/2013

Size: 5.08MB

INSTITUTE FOR ANIMATION AND GAMING, ENUGU (A STUDY ON PASSIVE DESIGN STRATEGIES AS AN EFFECTIVE TOOL IN THE DESIGN OF SUSTAINABLE LEARNING SPACES)

By Odoh Peter Ejike

Every decision that architects, engineers, builders, and homeowners make about the design and
operation of their buildings carries with it an energy cost, and all energy costs in turn have
environmental costs. For example, changing the orientation of a window, or the colour of the roof,
or adding a sun control will change the amount of electricity it uses for lighting and air
conditioning. Passive design; an idea within the growing trend of green buildings, is a creative
way to use the natural resources such as sunlight and breezes, to our advantage, both for heating
and cooling, based on the design of buildings. Passive design can greatly reduce resource demands.
Passive design is also, by necessity, coupled with and supportive of sustainable practices.
Employing passive design strategies in urban environments has the benefits of reducing resource
consumption, making urban living more adorable, and connecting human experience more deeply
into a direct relationship with resources.
This study is aimed at identifying passive design features through extensive literature study that
can be incorporated into educational buildings to make them energy efficient. The study is also
aimed at identifying changes in the design process that can affect energy efficiency in educational
buildings.
The findings from this study indicate that proper orientation, reducing openings and increasing the
thickness on external walls on east and west, and use of appropriate horizontal overhang ratios for
all four orientations can reduce the cooling load of educational buildings in Enugu, hence reduce
the total energy use of such buildings. Finally it can be concluded that the process of designing
energy efficient educational buildings is not a ‘one-man’s show’. Architects, builders, engineers,
developers, interior designers and clients must collaborate to bring a change in the design practice.
Keywords: Energy- efficient; passive design features; educational building; sustainable practices.

Published: 29/09/2014

Tags: Energy efficient, passive design, educational building, sustainable design, Enugu, animation institute, gaming, Architecture,

Size: 16.96MB

A Model Student Hostel Block for Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University Bauchi

By Okwenna Chika Victoria

A Model Student Hostel Block for Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University Bauchi

Published: 06/06/2006

Size: 24.74MB

Youth Tourist Village Akwuke Enugu

By Ogbonna, Chibueze I.

Youth Tourist Village Akwuke Enugu

Published: 07/05/2004

Size: 8.81MB