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DIETARY MANAGEMENT IN NATIONAL HOSPITAL, ABUJA- A CASE STUDY

By Anafulu, Ugo Chinyere

The study investigated the evidence of diabetes, its complications, risk factors and dietary management of 204 (54.9% males and 45.1% females) diabetic patients attending National Hospital, Abuja. Height and weight of patients were obtained, body mass index (BMI) of the patients were calculated and fasting blood glucose (FBG), systolic and diastolic pressure were obtained from patient’s folder. A 24-hour dietary recall was carried out on all the respondents. Three-day weighed food intake on 25 (10%) respondents was obtained to determine energy intake. The result showed that 23.04% of the patients were diabetic (D), 29.41% were diabetic hypertensive (D+HBP), 16.18% obese diabetic (D+OB) 9.31% diabetic, obese and hypertensive (D+OB+HBP) and 22.06% diabetic with other complications. The energy intakes when compared with prescribed energy levels for patients were all above 50% and when compared with the FAO/WHO requirement was about 50% on the average

Published: 02/12/2018

Tags: dietary management, National Hospital Abuja, case study

Size: 317.00KB

DIETARY MANAGEMENT IN NATIONAL HOSPITAL, ABUJA- A CASE STUDY

By Anafulu, Ugo Chinyere

The study investigated the evidence of diabetes, its complications, risk factors and dietary management of 204 (54.9% males and 45.1% females) diabetic patients attending National Hospital, Abuja. Height and weight of patients were obtained, body mass index (BMI) of the patients were calculated and fasting blood glucose (FBG), systolic and diastolic pressure were obtained from patient’s folder. A 24-hour dietary recall was carried out on all the respondents. Three-day weighed food intake on 25 (10%) respondents was obtained to determine energy intake. The result showed that 23.04% of the patients were diabetic (D), 29.41% were diabetic hypertensive (D+HBP), 16.18% obese diabetic (D+OB) 9.31% diabetic, obese and hypertensive (D+OB+HBP) and 22.06% diabetic with other complications. The energy intakes when compared with prescribed energy levels for patients were all above 50% and when compared with the FAO/WHO requirement was about 50% on the average

Published: 02/12/2018

Tags: dietary management, National Hospital Abuja, case study

Size: 317.00KB

Flatulence and other Abdominal Discomforts in Humans Associated with Consumption of Cowpeas (Vigna Unguiculata)

By Ndubaku, O. V.

This study assessed the level pf discomforts particularly flatulence consequent on was used to identify the problems associated with cowpea consumption on 446 families in Nsukka Local Government Area,

Published: 01/11/1988

Tags: Flatulence, Abdominal Discomforts, Humans, Cowpeas, (Vigna Unguiculata)

Size: 11.02MB

Chemical Composition of Some Indigenuos Vegetables jatropha aconitifolia and colocash esculenta and Effect of their Extracts on the Zinc Iron and Vitamin: A Metabolism in Rats.

By Ngwu, Nkemjika Nnedinso

The nutrient potentials of Colocasia esculenta and Jatropha aconitifolia leaves
were determined. The leaves were collected from home garden of some staff in University of Nigeria Nsukka, Enugu State, Nigeria. The leaves were cleaned and analysed fresh for nutrient and antinutrient composition. The leaf extract were collected and supplemented with rat chow for rat feeding.

Published: 18/12/2018

Tags: nutrient potentials, Colocasia esculenta, Jatropha aconitifolia, rat feeding

Size: 1.26MB

THE EFFECT OF SPROUTING ON THE NUTRITIVE QUALITIES OF MILLET (Pennisetum americanum) AND COWPEA (Vigna unguiculata) FLOURS AND THEIR BLENDS

By Lilian Imuetinyan Salami

This study was aimed at evaluating the effects of sprouting on the nutritive quality and supplementary value of cow-pea to millet flour.

Published: 02/12/2018

Tags: sprouting, millet, cowpea, Pennisetum americanum

Size: 5.11MB

The Effect of Sprouting on the Nutritive Qualities of Millet (Pennisetum americanum) and Cowpea (Vigna unquiculate) Flours and their Blends.

By Lilian Imuetinyan Salami

this shows results on The Effect of Sprouting on the
Nutritive Qualities of Millet (Pennisetum
americanum) and Cowpea (Vigna unquiculate)
Flours and their Blends.

Published: 01/12/1990

Tags: Sprouting, Nutritive Qualities, Millet (Pennisetum americanum), Cowpea (Vigna unquiculate) Flours, Blends.

Size: 1.74MB

Marketing Studies, Consumption Profile and Nutritive Value of Bambara Groundnut (Voandzeia Subterranea) and Cowpea (Akidi Ani) (Viona Unouiculata

By Ikeme, P. O. Auth

This study examined the patterns of
utilization and nutritive value of bambara groundnut and Iakidi ani'
as well as their relative cost to other foods.

Published: 01/09/1988

Tags: Marketing, Consumption, Nutritive Value,Bambara Groundnu,t (Voandzeia Subterranea), Cowpea, (Akidi Ani), (Viona Unouiculata

Size: 11.94MB

The Assessment of Nutritional Status and the Adequacy of Cereal-Legume Diets Feed Motherless Babies at Nsukka and Enugu Centres

By Ifudu, Vivienne Nkiruka

Weight, height, arm, chest, and head circumferences were the anthropometric measurements used in assessing the nutritional status of 30 inmates of the motherless babies.

Published: 15/08/1986

Tags: nutriutional status, cereal, legumes, motherless babies, diets feed.

Size: 8.62MB

Composition and in-Product Organolepttic Assessment of Composite Flours From Fermented Cereals Legumes, and Tubers/Roots

By Mbah, B.o.

The study was undertaken to produce cheap, nutritious and acceptable foods for both young and old from fermented locally available commonly consumed cereal, tuber/root and legume flours. Sorghum (SG), yellow maize (YM), cocoyam (CY), sweetpotato (SP) and cowpea (CP) were purchased from local sources. The food stuff were cleaned and fermented for 72hours. The fermented foods were drained, and sundried to about 95% dry matter. The dried foods were hammer milled into fine flours and stored in the freezer in separate polythene bags.

Published: 09/06/2000

Tags: composition, in-product, organolepttic assessment, fermented cereals, legumes, tubers

Size: 7.88MB

The Effects of Varying Sprouting Periods on the Nutritional Quality of Normal Yellow Corn (Zea Mays)

By Obizoba, Ikemefuna Christopher.

The Effects of Varying Sprouting Periods
on the Nutritional Quality of Normal
Yellow Corn (Zea Mays)

Published: 12/09/1990

Tags: Sprouting Periods, Corn, Nutritive Value, Rats

Size: 186.81KB

Nutritional Status of Rural Preschool Children in the University of Agriculture Abeokuta Extension Villages

By Agbon, Chineze Anene Auth

Malnutrition perpetuates itself generation 'by generation, stunted adulthood anemia,
adolescent fractures and osteoporosis later in life are public health problems which
result from inadequate supply of nutrients in preschool diets and the prevalence being
more in the rural areas than in the urban areas. It is, therefore, the general objective of
this study to assess the nutritional status of preschool children living in the rural area. A
community-based study was carried out in the University of Agriculture Abeokuta
[UNAAB] extension villages in Ogun State southwestern part of Nigeria to determine
the nutritional status of preschool children living in those villages and to identify factors
that could have influenced their nutritional status. This location was chosen because
data on these rural communities are scarce. The children's nutritional status was studied
using anthropometric assessment, nutrient intake, clinical examination and biochemical
analysis. A questionnaire that solicited information on the children's demographic data
and maternal child care practices was used to identify caregiver's factors that could
have influenced their nutritional status. All preschool children aged between 2 and
5years that were not ill and whose parents agreed to be part of the study were sampled.
A total of 116 preschool children in nine villages formed the population for the study.
Data were analyzed using EPI Info version 3.3.2 and SPSS software package. Results of
the study showed stunting to be of moderate prevalence (22.5%) within the population.
Some (7.8%) of the preschool children were severely stunted and 21.6% of them were
at risk. Many of the children (16.4%) were wasted an indication of a current and long
duration malnutrition. Time allocated to child care was low (60-120mins) by 73% of the
mothers. Majority of the respondents (75.9%) complained of recurrent fever episodes
that affected their food intake during the periods and they also exhibited high intestinal
parasite load such as Ascaris lumbricodes that was positive in (39%) of the children. All
the respondents were zinc deficient, and only 5.2% and 19% of them were not anaemic
and calcium deficient, respectively. Clinical signs such as bone deformity were also
observed in 6.9% of the population. The rural diet consumed by the preschool children
in this study was found to be a simple monotonous one containing mainly roots, cereals,
beans and tuber. Dishes with negligible quantities of fish and meat and fruits were taken

Published: 11/01/2018

Size: 3.35MB

Iodine Status, Growth and Parasitic infestation of Primary School Children in Obukpa, a Rural Nigerian Community

By Nwamarah, Joy Ugo

ABSTRACT
Recently, iodine deficiency has been recognized as the leading worldwide cause
of preventable intellectual impairment, spontaneous abortions, stillbirth, impaired
fetal development and childhood growth defects. Eliminating iodine deficiency
disorder (IDD) is a global public health priority. Sub-clinical iodine deficiency can
be detected by measuring urinary iodine or assessing thyroid function. Iodine is
an element that directly affects thyroid gland secretions, which themselves to a
great extent control heart action, nerve response to stimuli, rate of body growth
and metabolism. Intestinal disorders, parasitic infestation and nutrient
interactions can impair iodine absorption and utilization. This study was designed
to access the iodine status, growth and the parasitic infestation of primary school
children. The study also tried to ascertain knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP)
of mothers on iodine deficiency disorder and iodized salt utilization, thereby
determining their effect on iodine status growth velocities of the children.
Sampling of the three schools (Ajuona CPS, Owerre-Obukpa CPS and
AmagulUmuorua CPS) was by random sampling using balloting from five
schools in the community, while the children were selected by stratified method
using the class register in each school. Questionnaires were used to elicit basic
information from the children's parents on social and demographic characteristics
of households, health facilities and practices, health records, morbidity, health
status, knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of mothers on iodized salts and
. ,. , . m, ... ,
iodine deficiency disorder (IDD). The anthropometric measurements of 272
children composing of 154 boys and 146 girls aged 6-12years were taken to
assess their nutritional status using standard procedures. A sub-sample of 33
children was monitored for 12 months to assess their growth velocities; 11
children from each school were randomly selected. Their stools were collected
for assessing the parasitic load, and urine for biochemical analysis of urine iodine
levels. Salt from their homes were tested for iodine content with iodine spot-test
kit. Means, standard deviation, Student t-test, analysis of variance and
correlation coefficient were used where applicable. Anthropometric
measurements of the children revealed that 25% were stunted, 13% were
underweight while 6.3% were wasted. More girls (3.0%) than boys (2.3%) were
wasted. The weight velocities of the children were higher in the dry season
(0.57kg) than in the wet season (0.29kg). Also their height velocities were higher
in the dry season (1.98cm) than in wet season (0.62cm). There were significant
differences in the mean weight velocities of the children in wet and dry seasons
(t= 3.674, P0.05)
in the mean weight velocities of the boys (0.30kg) and girls (0.26kg), as well as in
the height velocities (t= 1.03, P>0.05) of the boys (0.95cm) and girls (1.00cm).
The weight velocities for boys according to schools attended showed differences
(Ajuona CPS, 0.36kg; Amagu/Umuorua CPS, 0.32kg; and Owerre-Obukpa CPS,
0.30kg; but were not significant, f=3.85, P>0.05) and for height (Ajuona CPS,
0.61cm; AmaguIUmuorua CPS, 1.61cm; and Owerre-Obukpa CPS, 0.65cm; but
were not significant, f=3.89, P>0.05). There were differences in the weight
velocities for girls (Ajuona CPS, 0.46kg; AmaguIUmurua CPS, 0.29kg and
Owerre-Obukpa CPS, 0.23kg; but they were not significant, f=3.77, P>0.05), and
height (Ajuona CPS, 1.14cm; AmaguIUmurua CPS, 1.41 cm and Owerre-Obukpa
CPS, 0.76cm; but were not significant, f=3.95, P>0.05). More than fifty percent
(58.33%) of the children were severely iodine deficient, boys (33.33%) and girls
(25%). The urinary iodine level ranged from about (10 to 650pgIL). The intestinal
parasitic loads were generally low. There were no significant relationships
between worm infestations of children in the various schools and their urine
iodine levels. Wasting in- ~h'ildien'~wapso sitively correlated with the worm
infestation and this was significant (r=0.467, P0.05) and
underweight (r=0.240, P>0.05) in the children, but were not significant. Low
urinary iodine excretion was more in the stunted children (60.0%) than in the
normal children (21.2%). Most of the salts consumed in the homes were
adequate in iodine. About 91% of marketed salt and 97% of salt brought from
homes were iodized above 3oppm' iodine level. However, there was generally
poor knowledge about iodized salt and iodine deficiency disorders by the
mothers.

Published: 11/09/2018

Tags: Iodine Status, Growth, Parasitic infestation, Primary School Children, Obukpa, a Rural

Size: 4.51MB

Nutrition Knowledge, Perceived Benefits of Healthy Eating, and Nutritional Status of Ebonyi State University Community Faculty

By Njoku, Helen Amaka

the study investigated thc nutrition knowledge, perceived benefits of healthy eating and
nutritional status of Ebonyi state university con~n~unityT.h e community is compsised of
main. Ishiekc and - Presco campuses. Inl-brmation on nutrition and perceived benefit of
hcalthy eating was obtained l'rom randomly selected 300 respondents within the age range of
20- 00 ycars. A 24-hour dietary recall and tlii-ec- day weighed food intake were used to
asscss the food intake pattern of 30 (10%) respondents. Analysis of data showed that 45% of
the respondents had good knowledge of nutrition, 30.7% had fair knowledge and 18.3% had
~mor kno\vledgc. Overall, mean nutrition knowledge of females (2.4620.77) was sliglitly
higher than that of males (2.43k0.83). Variety and balance were the major (59.8'!4)
characteristics perceived by the respondents as healthy eating followed by more fruits and
vegelables (20.5'%), more iiber (9.70/0), fresh natural foods (7.1%) and less fat (3.6%). More
males (42%) chose less fat as criterion for liealthy eating and more females (61.3%) selected
more fruits and vegetables. Food habit (56%) was the major factor that influenced food
choice followed by cost of food (34%). Thc major factor for non- academic staff were
looking attractive, living longer and doing well in sports. Increase in income was a function
of healthy eating. There was a significant ( p 4 . 05) positive correlation between educational
level and nutrition knowledge. As the educational qualification decreased nutrition
knowledge also dccreasecl. Nulrilion knowledge and nutritional status of the respondents
were comparable (pN.05). 'I'he mean RMI of the felnales (28.77 + 2.92) was higher than
that of males (25. 30 _+ 1.33). Twelve males (4%) and 50 (16.7%) females were obese. The
intakc ol'all nutricnls (energy, protein, calcium, iron, thiamin, riboflavin. and ascorbic acid)
wcrc over 70'X for both males and females excei~t for vitamin A in females and niacin in
males. As judged by the results, continuous nutrition education programme should be
organized for members of Ebonyi state university community.

Published: 11/09/2018

Tags: Nutrition Knowledge, Perceived Benefits, Healthy Eating,Nutritional Status, Ebonyi State University Community

Size: 1.12MB

INFANT FEEDING PATTERNS AND COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF FORMULATED WEANING FOOD BASED ON VEGETABLE PROTEINS.

By Adaoha, Charity Uwaegbute

INFANT FEEDING PATTERNS AND
COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF
FORMULATED WEANING FOOD
BASED ON VEGETABLE PROTEINS.

Published: 11/09/1987

Size: 965.42KB

Composition and in-Product Organolepttic Assessment of Composite Flours From Fermented Cereals Legumes, and Tubers/Roots

By Mbah, B.o.

The study was undertaken to produce cheap, nutritious and acceptable foods
for both young and old from fermented locally available commonly consumed cereal,
tuberlroot and legume flours. Sorghum (SG), yellow maize (YM), cocoyam (CY), sweet
potato (SP) and cowpea (CP) were purchased from local sources. The food stuff were
cleaned and fermented for 72hours. The fermented foods were drained, and sundried
to about 95% dry matter. The dried foods were hammer milled into fine flours and
stored in the freezer in separate polythene bags. The flours were blended into
composites SGCP, YMCP, SGCY, YMSP, YMCY, at the ratio of (70:30) and (60:20:20)
for YMCPCY and SGCPSP for the production of cakes prorridges and jellof agidi. The
crude protein of fermented flours increased in the following magnitude 7.0 to 1 O.8%,
7.0 to 8.8%, 3.7 to 7.0% and 2.6 to 3.6% for SG, YM, SP and CY respectively but
that for CP decreased from 27.5 - 26.5%. The fermented food stuff flour had low
carbohydrate content except for flour from fermented cocoyarn that had an increase
of 0.35% . Fat content of fermented food flour is lower in all cases except that from
SG flour which showed an increase of 5.4% over the flour of an unfermented grain
Cakes, porridges and jellof agidi blends were highly rated by a taste panel consisting
of twenty two persons 15 female and 7 males. Cowpea LCp) had better mutual
supplementary effect had to both SG and YM and the blend containing cowpea SGCP,
YMCP, SGCPSP and YMCPCY had higher protein values and were much more
acceptable than other blends. Cocoyam had similar but lower mutual supplementary
effect and acceptability with yellow maize. From the results SGCP. YMCP, SGCPSP
and YMCPCY containing cowpea, a legume has good potentials and could be
incorporated into children and adult foods when supplemented properly to up grade the
energy and other nutrient intake of the community.

Published: 11/09/2018

Tags: Organolepttic Assessment,Fermented Cereals Legumes, Tubers/Roots

Size: 7.88MB